No Entry

“You can’t go in there!” Doris heard a little boy’s voice. 

She twisted from her perch on the ladder. “Of course I can.” 

Doris lifted her right foot to the next rung, “I’ve climbed this high, why can’t I go in?” 

She laughed and said, “Do you have some silly rule about no girls?”

The boy shook both his fists, “You are an adult.”

“I am not an adult!” Doris fired back at the little red headed boy. 

The boy looked confused, “You are old, you must be 100.”

She continued to climb.

The little boy turned in a huff and began to yell, “Mom, grandma is trying to get in my treehouse again!” 

The mother guided the boy back to the yard and reminded him that grandma doesn’t remember that she is an adult. 

She took the boy’s cheeks in both her hands, “Please be patient with grandma, she gets confused.” 

The woman stood and took the boy by the hand. “Come on, let’s get Grandma out of the tree.”

photo-noentry
photo by Yarnspinnerr

 

Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers shares a photo each Monday. The writer’s job is to tell a story using 100 – 175 words.

11 thoughts on “No Entry

    1. treerabold Post author

      Sad indeed. I think more so for the child that didn’t understand. As you say her childlike behavior was a bit inspiring. Thanks for commenting

      Reply
  1. notestowomen

    Moving story. It’s tough to see loved ones deteriorate right before our eyes. I like how the boy’s mother handled this. My mother suffers from Parkinson’s and I have had to explain this to my ten year old when he sees some of the symptoms. Once we explain things to kids, they’re fine. The last time we visited her, he was showing her some simple exercises and she was doing them. It was wonderful to see.

    Reply
    1. treerabold Post author

      Thank you for stopping by.
      I love that your son is able and willing to interact with his grandma. It can be very scary for children when an adult doesn’t “act right.”
      But I believe you are right. If a child is given the information they handle things much better.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: A Field of Bodies | Conversations Around the Tree

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